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Lectures in English

Klik her for foredrag på dansk.

 

bullet LECTURES IN ENGLISH
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My main areas are

-          Translation Studies,

-          principles and organisation of translation work,  and

-          literary narratives (Harry Potter, the brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen).

This listing will be updated every third month or so. It contains brief abstract about lectures that I offer when invited. It goes without saying that they can be changed.

The lectures are all power-point presentations.

I can be reached by means of ‘Contact’ on this homepage.

At the time of posting (January 2008), the following themes are prepared for power-point presentation:

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Translation and Translation Studies:

Translation work at the European Union institutions

This lecture is given by me as an interested outsider observing language work of the European Union institutions. With 23 official languages, and several thousand language workers, the European Union is a front runner in professional language work. The lecture will discuss the workings of the institutions and how they tackle the many problems they face in language work.

 

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English and translation in today’s world

English is rapidly becoming the dominant (but definitely not the only) language of international communication. The lecture focuses on how English has become central to, performs at, and may influence translation work in the age of globalisation.

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Relay in Translation Studies and in practical translation work, past and present

The lecture addresses the existence of intervening realisations of translations before ‘source texts’ eventually make it into specific (third, fourth, etc.) target-languages. It discusses problems and implications historically and today.

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Brave new worlds of translation and Translation Studies

The lecture takes a look at the forces that are changing translation globally, including the Internet, man-machine interaction etc., and the obligations this will place on translators.

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Modes of translation in today’s world

Few professional translators, students, and scholars of translation are fully aware of the wide array of modes and activities found in translation work today. The lecture describes e.g. consecutive and simultaneous interpreting, prima vista, subtitling, surtitling and touches upon the enormous variations in ‘written’ translation.

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Translation history and globalisation

This is an overview surveying stages and trends in translation since the earliest records to the present day. It is based mostly on Western developments but also takes in histories and features from scenes outside the West.

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The dos and don’ts in scholarly work

Based on my own experience as a user, a producer, and a former editor of a prestigious international journal, I discuss pitfalls and ways to avoid them.

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Narratives:

The Harry Potter Saga as a modern, international story told by a brilliant narrator

This is a discussion of how, using background research and fundamental narrative skills with incredible knack, J.K. Rowling makes the Harry Potter riveting reading and evokes a multiplicity of individual responses not only with readers in Great Britain but worldwide. She has deservedly become a world-class bestselling author.

(The lecture is NOT identical with publication no 219 but that piece gives an idea of the contents)

PLEASE TAKE NOTE: WITH DUE PREPARATION AND PROVIDED STUDENTS KNOW THE BOOKS, THIS CAN BE EXPANDED INTO A COURSE OF 7-12 CLASSES OR A SEMINAR

 

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Europe, folktales, and how Hans Christian Andersen came to tell fairytales

In this lecture I discuss the Europe of the Napoleonic Wars (1796-1815) that created an intellectual, Romantic longing for the past. This was behind the publication of the Tales by the German brothers Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm (1812-1815). Exploring the Danish response to these German Tales, I illustrate how coincidence made Hans Christian Andersen realise that stories like those from his childhood appealed to children and adults alike – and also why he never dared tell how he made this discovery.

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The garbs and forms of folktales and fairytales of the common folk get in genteel retelling and translation

The lecture discusses how many stories – which we naively believe are ‘the same’ – are changed in subtle as well as crude ways, once they are taken over by editors and translators. The examples discussed are from e.g. the brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen.

 

 

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